Aim To Fail Like A Child.



Read this question then pause and reflect before continuing on…

At what age did your failures become ‘failures’ rather than a learning child’s experience?

Pause.

Reflect.

Failure is a common theme among inspirational literature.  There are so many empowering growth mindset oriented perspectives for us contemplate.   Often we grasp at these to soothe our fears of inadequacies, to calm our anxieties as we strive for success. We grasp at these truth-based intelligent mindsets – and yet we ‘grasp’.  Why?

While these mindsets and perspectives are cognitively accurate and acceptable, they lack emotional believability – particularly when we are facing the failure experience or its consequences face to face.  We find ourselves clinging to these mindsets in an almost “fake it till you make it” manner hoping that they manifest!

How do we increase the genuine emotional believability of these wonderful mindsets at the time that we most need them?

Consider our emotional response to watching a child attempt a task and fail.

You will probably identify that you are compassionate and helpful in response to the child, that you offer to comfort and then teach the child, because you hold a highly believable perspective that a child is not expected to perfect the task as they are existing in a life phase of continued learning.

The expectations you hold about performance are reasonably set for a human being who is not only learning but is also “human” and hence acceptably imperfect.

The expectations you hold about performance are reasonably set for a human being who is not only learning but is also “human” and hence acceptably imperfect.

We mentally identify the positives in the failure performance and highlight them.

We ‘deconstruct’ the task into manageable chunks, infused with development and learning, that ensure future success experience for the child.

We identify the skill, knowledge or attribute development need.

We positively and supportively bring this awareness to the child and set a course for ‘offering’ the opportunity to strive again.

We do all of this with a genuine attitude of positive regard for the ‘successes so far’ and the future potential of the child.

At what age did your failures become ‘failures’ rather than a learning child’s experience?

Is it possible for you to believe that there is no such age?  That perhaps the all moments of your life (regardless of age number attributed) are a continuous learning experience in which you are acceptable in your human imperfectness.   

Is it possible that you can simply identify the positives in the failure performance and highlight them; ‘deconstruct’ the task into manageable chunks, infused with development and learning, that ensure future success experience for yourself; identify the skill, knowledge or attribute development need;  positively and supportively bring this awareness to yourself setting set a course for ‘offering’ the opportunity to strive again? 

Is it possible to do all of this with a genuine attitude of positive regard for the ‘successes so far’ and the future potential yourself – an imperfect human living a continuous experience of learning?

How do we increase the genuine emotional believability of these wonderful mindsets at the time that we most need them?

I challenge you at all points in your life – regardless of the number of age in years that you have been allocated – to consider yourself as you would a child continuously learning, failing, and striving.

I challenge you at all points in your life – regardless of the number of age in years that you have been allocated – to consider yourself as you would a child continuously learning, failing, and striving.

I challenge you at all points in your life – regardless of the number of age in years that you have been allocated – to offer yourself the same compassionate acceptance and supportive hand up that you would any child who you recognise to be on a continued path of learning.

This is the foundation that is needed for all other ‘failure’ mindsets to rest upon such that emotional believability releases your grasping and empowers your momentum.

The take home message.

Aim to fail like a child.

1 Comments on “Aim To Fail Like A Child.”

  1. Challenge accepted Cherie!😁 I need to show myself some self-compassion – just like I would my boys. Struggle is part of the learning because without struggle our brains can’t adapt and neurons don’t fire. “Acceptably Imperfect” – love it. Thank you

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